Rare Wood Veneer Styles Paldao, Bosse, Pecan, Butternut, And Avodire

In a society where everybody wants to be one of a kind, it makes sense that unique items are sought after. It works the same way in the world of veneer, where the best woodworkers, designers, and architects very often ask for rare woods. Keeping this in mind, I will be speaking of five species of rare veneers. Each one has unique characteristics that make it an excellent choice for only certain types of wood projects.

1. Paldao Veneer. Very similar to Orientalwood and Australian Walnut (the names are interchangeable), Paldao is a very unique and rare veneer that has a nice-looking mottle figure. It also looks comparable to American Black Walnut, but the black stripe in the mottle figure and the more red tone sets it apart. Paldao is used often in the manufacturing of furniture.

2. Bosse Veneer. This species is actually a Mahogany relative and has a pinkish pale color. It comes in many figured varieties including Pomelle and Fiddleback. Bosse is also called Spanish Cedar the same exact species with a different name. It is also used heavily in the interior of boats.

3. Pecan Veneer. This wood is basically interchangeable with Hickory. While the two woods are a different species, even the most knowledgeable woodworker would probably have a hard time telling the two apart. Pecan and Hickory can be calico, or two-toned light and dark, colored. It can also come in a single color, either dark or light. Pecan has been used in many different types of projects, from drum sticks to vehicle bodies.

4. Butternut Veneer. This wood is similar to Walnut in its grain pattern, but the color is whitish, similar to White Oak Veneer. For this reason, it often is called the White Walnut. The name Butternut doesnt necessarily bring up images of a rustic-looking wood, but rustic is actually an accurate description. Despite its rare nature, the species is grown primarily in the U.S. It is used very often in boats for interior trim.

5. Avodire Veneer. This is a yellow-pale wood with a bit of black-colored mottle figure, coming from Africa. It has a wavy-style grain pattern, and many say it is comparable to Satinwood or Primavera. Avodire is an excellent choice for high-end architectural designs and furniture projects.